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FAQ's

Crown Dental FAQ's

Brushing and flossing help control the plaque and bacteria that causes dental disease. Daily flossing is the best way to clean between the teeth and under the gum line. Electric toothbrushes are also recommended. They are easy to use and can remove plaque efficiently.

Brush your teeth at least twice a day (especially before going to bed at night) with an ADA approved soft bristle toothbrush and toothpaste. Brush at a 45 degree angle to the gums, gently using a small, circular motion, that protects you always feel the bristles on the gums. Brush the outer, inner, and biting surfaces of each tooth.

All toothpastes aid to remove surface stains through the action of mild abrasives. Some whitening toothpastes contain gentle polishing or chemical agents that gives additional stain removal.

Whitening toothpastes can help remove surface stains and do not contain bleach; over-the-counter and professional whitening products contain hydrogen peroxide (a bleaching substance) that helps remove stains on the tooth surface as well as stains deep in the tooth. They can help to lighten your tooth's color by about one shade. In contrast, light-activated whitening conducted in your dentist's office can make your teeth three to eight shades lighter.

You can evidently the number of cavities you get. Always spend two to three minutes brushing your teeth. It takes long time to get rid of the bacteria which destroy tooth enamel. Do not brush too hard. It takes very little pressure to remove bacteria and plaque.

Watch the sugar you eat. There is sugar in candy, fruits, crackers and chips. These are the foods that the produce bacteria in your mouth. Be mindful of foods like raisins and peanut butter that stick to your teeth. They can make a constant supply for the bacteria eating into your teeth. Try to minimize the times during the day when sweets are eaten and clean your teeth afterwards.

Many factors work to destroy the natural white smile we are born with. Tobacco, certain foods we eat, and certain drinks actually stain teeth. These substances continually work on our teeth causing our white smile to gradually fade.

Hot coffee and tea is the main hazardous to your smile because they change the temperature of your teeth. This temperature change—hot and cold cycling—causes the teeth to expand and contract allowing stains to penetrate the teeth. Cutting down on coffee and tea can go a long way to creating a great smile.

Front teeth gets break due to a knock, an accident or during biting. Back teeth can also be fractured from a knock. They are more likely than front teeth, to crack from forces applied by the jaws slamming together rapidly. This is why sportspeople wear mouth guards to cushion the blow.

Other forces occur during sleep because people grind their teeth with a much greater force than they would ever do while awake. The first sign of problems may be what we call "cracked tooth syndrome" – a sore or sensitive tooth somewhere in the mouth that is often hard for even the dentist to find. In sometimes the grinding causes tooth wear rather than fracture.

NO. Good brushing is very important to help prevent dental decay and periodontal disease, however brushing alone is not enough. It is also very important to clean between your teeth. This is why flossing is so important.

The best toothbrush is one with a small head and soft bristles. Electric toothbrushes can also be very good, particularly for people who find proper brushing techniques difficult to master. Always use a toothpaste containing fluoride. Fluoride combines with minerals in your saliva to toughen your tooth enamel and help stop decay.

Bitten tongue or lip - Apply direct pressure to bleeding area with a clean cloth. If swelling is present, apply cold compress. If bleeding doesn't stop readily or the bite is severe, go to the dentist or hospital.

Broken tooth - Try to clean debris from the injured area with warm water. If caused by a blow, place a cold compress on the face next to the injured tooth to minimize swelling. Try to find all the bits that are missing and bring them to the dentist, keeping them moist. Some broken bits can be bonded back onto the teeth almost invisibly. Go to the dentist as soon as practicable.

Porcelain veneers are very thin shells of tooth-shaped porcelain that are individually crafted to cover the fronts of teeth. They are very durable and will not stain, making them a very popular solution for those seeking to restore or enhance the beauty of their smile.

Veneers may be used to restore or correct the following dental conditions: severely discolored or stained teeth, unwanted or uneven spaces, worn or chipped teeth, slight tooth crowding, misshapen teeth and teeth that are too small or large. The veneers are carefully fitted and bonded onto the tooth surface with special bonding cements and occasionally a specialized light may be used to harden and set the bond.

A mouthguard can prevent injuries to your face and teeth. Most people benefit from wearing a mouth guard when playing any sport. You should wear one whether you are playing professionally or just on weekends. Do what you can to preserve your smile and your health.

The best mouthguards are custom-fitted by your dentist. This is especially important if you wear braces or fixed bridgework. Commercial, ready-made mouthguards can be purchased at most sporting goods stores. They are relatively inexpensive but they are also less effective. In either case, rinse your mouthguard with water or mouthwash after each use. With proper care, it should last for several months.

The crack will expose the inside of the tooth (the 'dentine') that has very small fluid filled tubes that lead to the nerve ('pulp'). Flexing of the tooth opens the crack and causes movement of the fluid within the tubes. When you let the biting pressure off the crack closes and the fluid pressure simulates the nerve and causes pain.

Unlike fractures elsewhere in the body, this crack will never heal. There is a small chance that the crack will get worse even with a crown placed. This may lead to the need for root canal treatment, or even removal of the tooth. However, many cracks can be fixed without root canal or tooth removal.